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How to Make the Perfect Bowl

You know those perfectly curated “macro bowls” sweeping across Instagram? The ones that look like they took four hours to put together? What if I told you they’re actually incredibly simple and could even become your new weeknight go-to? A little bit of prep once a week and they’ll be as easy to throw together as a sandwich.
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Recipe and photos by Mackenzie Piccarreto

You know those perfectly curated “macro bowls” sweeping across Instagram? The ones that look like they took four hours to put together? What if I told you they’re actually incredibly simple and could even become your new weeknight go-to? A little bit of prep once a week and they’ll be as easy to throw together as a sandwich. 

These colorful meals are called macro bowls for a reason: They include all of the macronutrients we need—carbs, protein, fiber and fats. It’s truly my favorite way to eat; the combinations are endless and the satisfaction is real. Depending on the season, you might want a warm, cooked bowl or a crisp, raw variation.

Once you understand the basic components, you’ll nail it every single time. Things that you can do ahead of time to make it even easier: Cook the grains and roast or slice a bunch of veggies. You could also cook meat ahead of time if you’re including it; fish is probably best done in real time so it’s fresh (and it cooks fast anyway!).

Here are some suggestions:

Greens: Mixed greens
Grains: Brown rice (use local grains like emmer or wheat berries)
Protein: Shredded chicken, fried egg
Veggies: Sliced radishes/cucumbers/carrots
Healthy Fats: Half an avocado
Something Crunchy: Pepitas, pistachios
Seasoning: Chives, salt and pepper, za’atar
Something creamy: Goat cheese, curry hummus
Dressing: Olive oil, lemon, salt and pepper

Mackenzie Piccarreto is an integrative Health coach, the founder of Mackenzie’s Table and an all-around wellness geek. She believes that eating healthy doesn’t have to be difficult or boring—and that dark chocolate is absolutely necessary for good health. She gets most of her produce at the Brighton Farmers Market and from The Good Food Collective CSA.

This article originally appeared in the May/June 2019 edition of the magazine.

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